Resources


Design Details:

MULTI-WYTHE CAVITY WALL SYSTEM

 

Masonry Cavity Wall System

Lean Green Thermal Machine!

  • LEAN: Tall, slim, strong and handsome with limitless design choices
  • GREEN: Locally made and installed, minimal carbon foot print
  • THERMAL: Low thermal transfer to achieve significant energy savings
  • MACHINE: Sustainable passive cavity drainage system, structurally suited for low and high rise performance

Details & Isometric Drawings:

CMU Backup w/ Brick Veneer

Click here for a full set of MIM’s details

2″ RIGID INSULATION 3″ RIGID INSULATION
2″ Base Detail w/
Veneer Below Grade
1_2inch
3″ Base Detail w/
Veneer Below Grade
1_3inch
2″ Stone/Precast Sill
For Receptor Style Windows
2_2inch
 3″ Stone/Precast Sill
For Receptor Style Windows
2_3inch
 2″ Stone/Precast Sill
For Strap Style Windows3_2inch
3″ Stone/Precast Still
For Strap Style Windows
3_3inch
2″ Short Span Masonry Lintel
For Receptor Style Windows
4_2inch
 3″ Short Span Masonry Lintel
For Receptor Style Windows
4_3inch
2″ Stone/Precast
Coping Parapet Detail
5_2inch
3″ Stone/Precast
Coping Parapet Detail
5_3inch
2″ Metal Coping Parapet Detail
6_2inch
3″ Metal Coping Parapet Detail
6_3inch
2″ Upper Wall/
Low Roof Flashing Detail
7_2inch
3″ Upper Wall/
Low Roof Flashing Detail
7_3inch
Click here for a full set of MIM’s details

Generic Specification


CMU Multi-Wythe Specification


SINGLE-WYTHE GENERIC WALL DESIGN

 

Single Wythe Reinforced Walls


8″ CMU Exterior

12″ CMU Exterior

Generic CMU Single-Wythe Specification

BlockFlash® SYSTEM

 

BlockFlash® is an embeddable flashing pan for exterior single wythe CMU wall systems. It collects moisture that infiltrates the wall and flows down the vertical cores and diverts it to the exterior. BlockFlash® is a single wythe CMU flashing system that is useful at all flashing/weep hole locations including base of wall, above door and window openings, above bond beams, in parapet walls, basements and any other locations where flashing is necessary.

Available in:

  • 8″ CMU
  • 10″ CMU
  • 12″ CMU

 Product Data Sheet SDS  LEED
BlockFlash Warranty shoppingcart_blue Purchase Online
NCMA TEK-19-2B   Installation Instructions


RESIDENTIAL MASONRYHowTo

“Guide to Inspecting Residential Brick Veneer” –
Version 2

House


English Version

Spanish Version
Click here to download Order Form!

Builder Notes (Brick Industry Association)

Advanced Flashing – Stepped Flashing, Bay Windows, and Arches.


Builder Note

BRICK VENEER/METAL STUD CAVITY WALL DETAILS

 

Cavity Wall Details

Complete Set of Isometric Drawings & Details Now Available for Metal Stud Application!

Details & Isometric Drawings:

Brick Veneer/Metal Stud Details

S1.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud Base Detail
(Exposed Foundation w/AVB)


Isometric Drawing
S2.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud Base Detail
(Brick Below Grade w/AVB)


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S3.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud
(Natural Stone/Precast Concrete) Sill Detail


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S4.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud (Brick)
Sill Detail


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S5.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud Window
Head Detail


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S6.1a Brick (Natural Stone/Precast Coping)
Parapet Detail


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S6.1b Brick Veneer/Metal Stud (Metal Coping)
Parapet Detail


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S7.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud High Wall
at Low Roof


Detail

Isometric Drawing
 S8.1 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud
Window Jamb Detail


Detail
 S8.2 Brick Veneer/Metal Stud Door


Detail

 

 

Technical Data:

REBAR LAP SPLICING

 

LapSplice
Lap Splice Lengths for Masonry Walls

 

 


Download full PDF version

LOCATING CMU CONTROL JOINTS (CJ’s)

 

Approximate spacing of Control Joints (CJ’s) for reinforced CMU

Using the Empirical Method in NCMA TEK 10-2B, Table 1 calls for a length to height ratio of 1.5 not to exceed 25ft. This assumes you have wire every 16” o.c. The engineering method in NCMA TEK 10-3 has different ratios but still does not exceed 20 or 25 ft.
Kelly L.K. Walker, Architectural Services Director, Masonry Institute of Michigan, Inc.

Supporting Documents:


NCMA TEK 10-2C – Control Joints For Concrete Masonry Walls – Empirical Method

NCMA TEK 10-3 – Control Joints For Concrete Masonry Walls – Alternative Engineered Method

Download full PDF version

LOCATING BRICK EXPANSION JOINTS (EJ’s)

 

What are the approximate spacing for Expansion Joints (EJ’s) for a typical brick veneer application? Please read the following supporting documents.

Supporting Documents:


BIA Tech Note 18A – Accommodating Expansion of Brickwork

Brick Expansion Joints and Wall Openings – J. Gregg Borchelt, PE

Download full PDF version

CMU WIRE REINFORCING

 

What is the best type of wire reinforcement for use in Single-Wythe CMU or Multi-Wythe CMU Cavity Wall Systems?

 

Answer:

Contrary to popular belief, wire reinforcement does not contribute to structural stability in standard reinforced CMU walls. In fact, the primary purpose of wire reinforcement in modern masonry wall systems is simply to help resist CMU shrinkage cracking. Typically, vertical and bond beam rebar reinforcement serves to resist wind loading.

Ladder wire with cross rods spaced 16 inches on center allows code required centering of rebar, freer flow of grout and promotes full embedment in mortar at every intersection where side and cross rods meet on the inner and outer CMU face-shell, resisting wall shrinkage.

Truss wire is not recommended for use in reinforced CMU. Diagonal cross rods make it impossible to meet grouting standards referenced in IBC and sub-referenced in ACI Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures.

Surrounding heavy duty 3/16 inch diameter wire with mortar when placed in 3/8 inch bed joints is difficult to say the least. It can actually be detrimental. This is especially evident when considering allowed tolerances for masonry units and joint sizes. Mortar better surrounds wire when utilizing 9 gauge flush-welded side and cross rods, increasing resistance to shrinkage cracking.

Field-formed corners and mesh ties at intersections offer greater performance, economy and safety. Meet code and performance requirements with standard mill galvanized finish for interior walls not exposed to moisture and hot dip galvanized for exterior walls and interior walls exposed to high moisture or humidity.

In the case of CMU wire reinforcement there is truth to the old adage “Less is More”.


lessismore_lgcover
Less Is More

Supporting Documents:


NCMA TEK 12-2B – Joint Reinforcement for Masonry Structures

NCMA TEK 10-3 – Control Joints for Concrete Masonry Walls

2011BuildingCode_small    Updated

 



Selecting the right reinforcement for the job – Mario J. Catani

COLD AND HOT WEATHER CONSTRUCTION

 

Available Documents:


BIA Tech Note 1 – Cold and Hot Weather Construction

NCMA TEK 3-1C – All Weather Concrete Masonry Construction

Cold Weather and Hot Jobs – Winter Protection Article
HotCold_MIMarticlew
Hot & Cold Weather for Masonry Construction

MASONRY WALL BRACING STANDARDS

 

Standard Practice for
Bracing Masonry Walls Under ConstructionBracingMasonryWallsboth

The Standard Practice for Bracing Masonry Walls Under Construction was developed to provide mason contractors, general contractors, architects and engineers with a detailed definition of adequate bracing for masonry walls. The Standard was developed to clarify the existing OSHA code. It was written by engineers, mason contractors and others familiar with the masonry industry to provide for the health and safety of our industry’s employees. The Standard Practice for Bracing Masonry Walls provides:

  • Design requirements during the initial and intermediate periods
  • Design requirements for three different types of bracing systems – wood, steel pipe or cable
  • Tables and illustrations showing adequate bracing
  • Definitions of common wall bracing terms
  • Sample solutions to a number of design conditions
  • Commentary for further definition of the Standard

Available Now for Online purchase! Click here!

 

 

 

INTERNAL WALL BRACING
InternalWallBracingboth

For more information, please contact:
Todd Dailey, PE
Dailey Engineering, Inc.
T: 517-467-9000
todddailey@me.com
www.daileyengineeringinc.com

 

 

 

 

 

MICHIGAN WALL BRACING STANDARDS

MIOSHA

Available Documents:MIOSHAWall2

MasonryWallBracing
Masonry Institute of MI – Masonry Wall Bracing

State of Michigan Wall Bracing Standards
Frequently Asked Questions:

 


 

REBAR LAP SPLICING

LapSplice

 

Lap Splice Lengths for Masonry Walls

Question:

How do you calculate correct rebar lap splicing to meet code?

 

Answer:

The IBC 2006 adopted MSJC 2005 by reference; however they decided to keep the previous lap lengths of 48 bar diameters. …that engineers may have the option of using MSJC 2005 for their design lap lengths. Depending on the f’m the lap lengths can be shorter particularly in the smaller bar sizes. …Footnotes (1) & (2) represent comments in the IBC code. (1) instructs the engineer on additional lap requirements in areas of high stress, (2) addresses the requirements for epoxy coated rebar. Footnote (3) assumes the bars are spaced at least 8” on center if the bars are closer the table will need to be adjusted. All bars are centered in the wall, if the bars are designed off center the table will need to be adjusted. The f’m is a variable that may be changed to meet your project requirements. The IBC 2009 has adopted MSJC 2008 including the lap lengths. These laps match the MSJC 2005 requirements so the MSJC laps should be what we see in the future.
Below is a lap splice spreadsheet, provided by Kelly Walker of the Masonry Institute of Michigan, which has been updated for IBC 2006 as adopted in MBC 2006. Also below, are the MSJC 2005 laps.
Kyle Lochonic

 


Download full PDF version

LOCATING CMU CONTROL JOINTS (CJ’s)

 

Question:

What is the approximate spacing of Control Joints (CJ’s) for reinforced CMU?

 

Answer:

Using the Empirical Method in NCMA TEK 10-2B, Table 1 calls for a length to height ratio of 1.5 not to exceed 25ft. This assumes you have wire every 16” o.c. The engineering method in NCMA TEK 10-3 has different ratios but still does not exceed 20 or 25 ft.
Kelly L.K. Walker, Architectural Services Director, Masonry Institute of Michigan, Inc.

Supporting Documents:


NCMA TEK 10-2C – Control Joints For Concrete Masonry Walls – Empirical Method

NCMA TEK 10-3 – Control Joints For Concrete Masonry Walls – Alternative Engineered Method

Download full PDF version

LOCATING BRICK EXPANSION JOINTS (EJ’s)

 

Question:

What is the approximate spacing for Expansion Joints (EJ’s) for a typical brick veneer application?

 

Answer:

Please see the supporting documents below.

Supporting Documents:


BIA Tech Note 18A – Accommodating Expansion of Brickwork

Brick Expansion Joints and Wall Openings – J. Gregg Borchelt, PE

Download full PDF version

CMU WIRE REINFORCING

Question:

 

What is the best type of wire reinforcement for use in Single-Wythe CMU or Multi-Wythe CMU Cavity Wall Systems?

 

Answer:

Contrary to popular belief, wire reinforcement does not contribute to structural stability in standard reinforced CMU walls. In fact, the primary purpose of wire reinforcement in modern masonry wall systems is simply to help resist CMU shrinkage cracking. Typically, vertical and bond beam rebar reinforcement serves to resist wind loading.

Ladder wire with cross rods spaced 16 inches on center allows code required centering of rebar, freer flow of grout and promotes full embedment in mortar at every intersection where side and cross rods meet on the inner and outer CMU face-shell, resisting wall shrinkage.

Truss wire is not recommended for use in reinforced CMU. Diagonal cross rods make it impossible to meet grouting standards referenced in IBC and sub-referenced in ACI Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures.

Surrounding heavy duty 3/16 inch diameter wire with mortar when placed in 3/8 inch bed joints is difficult to say the least. It can actually be detrimental. This is especially evident when considering allowed tolerances for masonry units and joint sizes. Mortar better surrounds wire when utilizing 9 gauge flush-welded side and cross rods, increasing resistance to shrinkage cracking.

Field-formed corners and mesh ties at intersections offer greater performance, economy and safety. Meet code and performance requirements with standard mill galvanized finish for interior walls not exposed to moisture and hot dip galvanized for exterior walls and interior walls exposed to high moisture or humidity.

In the case of CMU wire reinforcement there is truth to the old adage “Less is More”.


lessismore_lgcover
Less Is More

Supporting Documents:


NCMA TEK 12-2B – Joint Reinforcement for Masonry Structures

NCMA TEK 10-3 – Control Joints for Concrete Masonry Walls

2011BuildingCode_small



Selecting the right reinforcement for the job – Mario J. Catani

Download full PDF version

 

Question:

Is wire reinforcement with 3/16 inch diameter side rods or 3/16 inch diameter side and cross rods better than standard 9 gauge side and cross rods?

 

Answer:

No, for the most part it is just the opposite. The primary purpose for wire in today’s reinforced walls is to reduce CMU wall shrinkage. It is very difficult to surround 3/16 inch diameter wire with mortar when placed in 3/8 inch bed joints. This is especially evident when considering allowed tolerances for masonry units and joint sizes. Mortar better surrounds wire when utilizing 9 gauge flush welded side and cross rods, increasing resistance to shrinkage cracking. It is no surprise demand for truss wire has fallen significantly in the last decade. The market simply demands higher performance 9 gauge 16 inch core-clear ladder!

Supporting Documents:

lessismore_lgcover
Less Is More

TECH Talk – Daniel S. Zechmeister, PE

Selecting the right reinforcement for
the job – Mario J. Catani
Industry Promotion:

COST GUIDE

 

Masonry Wall Cost Guide

The 2008 Masonry Wall Cost Guide is intended to provide users with an in-place wall square footage cost for 145 wall assemblies for six cities in Michigan: Ann Arbor, Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Lansing and Saginaw.

The 870 listed costs are provided as an aid to assist decision-makers in utilizing masonry economically.The figures represent total masonry cost including labor, material, overhead and profit. All masonry wall costs were based on a straight run wall with no openings. The cost will be greater when considering openings, corners, site conditions, material handling conditions and weather. Wall heights vary and were based on applicable design methodologies as noted.

View Cost Guide


BIA BRICK ORDINANCES

 

Benefit Community

University of Michigan Masonry Ordinance Research

The 2008 Masonry Wall Cost Guide is intended to provide users with an in-place wall square footage cost for 145 wall assemblies for six cities in Michigan: Ann Arbor, Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Lansing and Saginaw.

The 870 listed costs are provided as an aid to assist decision-makers in utilizing masonry economically.The figures represent total masonry cost including labor, material, overhead and profit. All masonry wall costs were based on a straight run wall with no openings. The cost will be greater when considering openings, corners, site conditions, material handling conditions and weather. Wall heights vary and were based on applicable design methodologies as noted.


View U of M Study

Thermal Bridging System

 

Modern Steel Construction

The following article is written by James A. D’Aloisio, P.E., SECB, LEED AP and is published in Modern Steel Construction:

Attending to thermal bridging can make a big improvement in the building envelope.

MSC_cover
Steel Framing & Building Envelopes
Fero_cover
Fero Fast Bracket


MASONRY INDUSTRY ARTICLES

 

The Story Pole

Following are articles written by the MASONPRO staff, published in MIM’s publication The Story Pole:


Backed Up By Design

Techniques to Improve Productivity & Wall Performance

Improved Technique for Flashing & Anchoring Stone

Anchors to Weeps

Sequencing Exterior Masonry Systems

Masonry Magazine

LessIsMore
Less Is More